Song of the Week – Rock in 60’s Psychedelic Films

Ignored           Obscured            Restored

This next installment of Rock in Films covers the late ‘60s psychedelic films.

By the late 60s, filmmakers began to incorporate rock music into their movies’ soundtracks and plots.  Director Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow Up (1966) was one of the best and first to utilize rock effectively.  The story takes place in “Swinging London” where a photographer inadvertently captures a murder on film and uses his images to try to solve the crime.

The film’s soundtrack was scored by Herbie Hancock, but there is a club scene that features a live performance by The Yardbirds, with Jimmy Page and Jeff Beck on guitars, doing “Stroll On” (better known as “Train Kept A Rollin’”).

Riot on Sunset Strip (1067) is a cheesy film that attempts to convey the essence of the LA/Hollywood scene around the time of the ’66 LA riot.  It has all the clichés of the day, including a film portrayal of an LSD trip.  But it also has numerous club scenes that feature some of the best garage/psych bands of the time, including The Standells, Chocolate Watchband and The Enemies (a band that featured Cory Wells, later of Three Dog Night).

Psych-Out (1968) was a movie starring Jack Nicholson, Bruce Dern and Susan Strasberg.  Susan’s character arrives in SF looking for her brother.  Although deaf, she is befriended by a hippie commune.  Again, there is film portrayal of an LSD trip.  The soundtrack includes music by The Seeds and Strawberry Alarm Clock.  There’s a ballroom scene where Nicholson’s band, Mumblin’ Jim, performs.  In reality, it is the Strawberry Alarm Clock with Nicholson pretending to be part of the group.

(Sorry Lawr!)

Nicholson wrote the screenplay for The Trip (1967), a film that portrays a television commercial director’s experience with – you guessed it – an LSD trip!  The movie stars Dern, Strasberg, Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper.  Of course, Fonda, Hopper and Nicholson would be back at it a couple of years later to film the much higher quality Easy Rider, but that’s a subject for another post.

The film’s music was provided by Mike Bloomfield and the Electric Flag, with only one on-screen performance that I don’t think was the Flag.  It may have been Gram Parsons’ International Submarine Band (did they have a lefty guitarist?) who were originally tapped to provide the soundtrack before getting replaced by Bloomfield.  Here’s the psychedelic club scene of the band playing “Fine Jug Thing,” complete with strobe lights, and painted women.

The Monkees decided to upend their squeaky clean, pre-fab four TV image through a film vehicle called Head (1968).  Nicholson was involved in this project too, as co-writer and co-producer with Bob Rafelson.  Though the flick has an incomprehensible plot, it does have a few gems on the soundtrack including “The Porpoise Song,” and “Circle Sky” that was performed in a concert scene for Head.

More on Rock in films to come in future posts.

Enjoy… until next week.

New York Dolls, Subway Train

Some of us are living in a city that relies on mass transit, the subway and the bus (and for some of the Dolls, the Ferry). But those things are gone for those of us who don’t have to go riding, riding, riding. So much is lost because of the pandemic and the way we respond to it. I wonder if we’d be better off if we didn’t shut down, or we did as we did. I know my mother, in an assisted living facility is alive. For those in Sweden, which didn’t shut down, many more are dead. So, do your best. Right?

https://youtu.be/z-K4FPGdXbE

The Great Little Richard is Dead

For me, Little Richard, was a guy on late nite commercials. Great songs, like those of the Big Bopper. But familiarity meant we cared less, partly because all we got was the big songs.

But as I grew up, I found other stuff. I wrote about one of those here. Listen to this! Not a rocker, exactly, but as great as a transitional blues-rock-soul cut as you can imagine. When Little Richard died today I went back to his first album, which finally was released after something like six big hit singles (it was a different world then, or come to think of it maybe it was the same world then with the different one sandwiched in between). I won’t argue this was the best, but listening to it I’ll say rock hasn’t moved an inch.

https://youtu.be/xO-iAnsqt_s

Song of the Week Revisited – Hope She’ll Be Happier, Bill Withers

Ignored         Obscured               Restored      

Today I learned that the great Bill Withers died at the age of 81. His family released a statement that said it was due to heart complications. At least it wasn’t Coronavirus related! In his honor I’d like to repost a SotW that I wrote about him on December 22, 2012.

I’ve always loved the Bill Withers’ song “Hope She’ll Be Happier” that was on his first album Just as I Am.  So without a lot of fanfare, here it is:

This album is the one with “Ain’t No Sunshine” on it.  It’s really a very good record with some great musical accompaniment from the Memphis boys down at Stax records and other top notch players like Stephen Stills, Jim Keltner and Chris Ethridge.

The song is very simple – a nice guitar figure is repeated over a passionate vocal delivered in the style of a black spiritual.  The lyric is about a man who is in great pain over losing his woman.  He can’t quite come to grips with the reason she left but hopes she will ultimately be happier with the new guy.

This song leaves me in the same emotional state I find myself in after hearing Leonard Cohen’s “Halleluiah” – especially the wonderful Jeff Buckley version.

Now there’s one more thing I need to share and that’s the version Withers’ recorded in Africa when he visited with the James Brown headlined 3 day festival that came to be known as “The Rumble In the Jungle.”  The 1974 concert is available on DVD under the title Soul Power.  Withers’ performance of “Hope She’ll Be Happier” at this concert will take your breath away.

In this version it’s just him, his guitar and his voice.  But it’s powerful.

Enjoy… until next week.

Link: Contemporary Music Archive

There is this place in Soho, in New York City, that has more than three million vinyl records for reference by researchers and movie studios and whatever. Really.

They’re being priced out because it’s valuable space and old records aren’t returning the $ per square foot that’s possible. So, the Times wrote about this. Good, interesting story. But here’s the deal. Why is this massive collection housed in NYC, where rents are big. That’s legacy thinking. My advice, send the albums to Pennsylvania somewhere, or the Catskills, and have a smaller public facing NYC exhibition space to draw folks in.

Everything worthwhile doesn’t have to be huge. It just needs enough support to sustain. And since Mr. George built a little bit of his fortune on records, here’s a great one (though not rock):

Song of the Week – Say It & The Slummer the Slum, “5” Royales

Ignored           Obscured            Restored

The earliest history of Rock and Roll covers the period when Alan Freed coined the term for the R&B records he was playing for teenagers in Cleveland on WJW radio.  And one of the most important R&B groups of that era was the “5” Royales.  The group was led by songwriter/guitarist Lowman “Pete” Pauling, who penned songs that would remain important for many decades, including:

Think – also recorded by James Brown and Mick Jagger

Dedicated to the One I Love – Shirelles and Mamas and Papas

Tell the Truth – Ray Charles and Ike & Tina Turner

But besides being a great songwriter, Loman was a terrific early electric guitar player.  I wanted to select a song that would highlight his playing, so I’ve chosen one of the group’s lesser known records, “Say It.”

“Say It” follows a predictable R&B formula, with piano triplets leading the way.  But its fuzzed out licks probably influenced more than a few ‘60s garage band guitarists.  Check out the insane riffs that open and end “Say It!”

Another, more popular “5” Royales track that features Lowman’s Les Paul is “The Slummer the Slum.”

Lowman’s guitar stabs are the prototype for Steve Cropper’s approach on Booker T & the MGs’ “Green Onions.”  Then at about 40 seconds, Lowman rips off a wild solo and does it again at around 1:35.

If you haven’t had exposure to Pauling beyond this post, please read the excellent article by Lisa O’donnell from his hometown Winston-Salem Journal.

https://www.journalnow.com/news/local/music-s-unsung-pioneer/article_760fb6eb-0c86-54f3-bc51-9147db6fe52f.html

Enjoy… until next week.

Hit Single

This song helped soften up America for punk. It was a juke box smash at Bumpers, a college bar I frequented in the late 70’s. It reached #47 on the American Billboard chart, higher maybe than any other punk single until the 1990’s. It almost became the actual hit it was in Britain (#8) and especially in the French-speaking countries. The Beach Boys meet Chuck Berry at a construction site. I am the king of the divan.