The Beatles Get Worst to First Treatment

Note first, Bill Wyman wrote this.

He’s a rock critic, not the Rolling Stones bassist. But does that matter?

I immediately check out the end and find Good Morning in last place. Geez. I like that tune, not in a rock sense, but in a music and attitude sense, it’s pretty powerful. So, I disagree.

And then it gets worse and better and worse, and there’s not reason to think about the ranking. This is an internet click bait thing, Wyman is a pretty decent critic, and does a good job of navigating through the ranks.

Which are totally wrong. Discuss.

http://www.vulture.com/2017/06/all-213-beatles-songs-ranked-from-worst-to-best.html

7 thoughts on “The Beatles Get Worst to First Treatment

  1. He has got to be kidding. Not A Second Time and I’ll Be Back are two of the BEST Beatles songs. I had to stop once I saw that, maybe I’ll give it another go next time I want to shake my head in despair.

  2. I looked this over fairly thoroughly and could write a whole bunch of stuff, but I’ll save you and give you a stupid analogy instead:

    Wednesday was my youngest daughter’s 8th grade graduation/moving on to high school ceremony. One of the speakers was a current high school student. She gave this long-winded, rambling speech (my girlfriend whispered, “then I had my period. . .”) that she surely put lots of time and effort into and all her teachers thought was wonderful. But it wasn’t good.

  3. I was going to huff and puff reading this, then I took a step back and was amazed that “Flying” made it inside the top 100. So I guess I got that going for me.

  4. I used to write this sort of stuff in the pre-Internet era, and instead of click-bait it was newsstand bait. No issue there. I was a little nonplussed that the author apparently didn’t keep track of his own opin ions on Rubber SoulThe author calls #174, “What Goes On,” “One of the least interesting songs on the otherwise sparkling Rubber Soul.” Remarkably, then, the song at the hardly-sparkling depths of #172, is “Think For Yourself,” from … Rubber Soul. This sparkling/non-sparkling inconsistency is repeated in the blurbs on lower-half Rubber Soul songs at #137 (“The Word” is “a less interesting, blaring track,” #118 (“Wait,” which he calls “an uninteresting song (whose) intro is one of their drabbest.”

  5. The Beatles figured they needed a whole lot of uninteresting to properly set all the sparkle. Like, I guess, “Michelle,” which I rank about #202.

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